Suzanne Kane © Copyright

Ceramic and Steel Sculpture ​

I hold a Bachelor of Fine Arts in sculpture from Michigan State University and a Master of Fine Arts in ceramics from New Mexico State University.  I have been a studio artist for the 15 years exhibiting nationally, represented by galleries in Santa Fe, Los Angeles, and Denver as well as numerous smaller venues.  My work is included in several permanent collections including The Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Montana, The New Mexico State Capitol, The Phoenix International Airport Art Collection, the Albuquerque Museum, The Las Cruces Museum of Fine Arts, The Las Cruces Downtown Plaza, and the Littleton Fine Arts Museum in Colorado.  I am also an educator and currently teach at the University of Texas, El Paso as a lecturer in the ceramics department.

ALL WORKS COPY WRITE © Suzanne Kane.  All rights reserved.

My work is inspired by the high Chihuahua Desert, where I live.  This land amazes me; despite a harsh climate and severe drought the landscape is filled with weird and wonderful growing things.   My sculptural forms are a reflection on the unusual seeds and structures that endure and survive in this landscape.  The sculptural plants I build are about resilience, persistence, toughness, durability, tenacity and adaptability.  I create small, pedestal size work, as well as large, exterior sculpture.  The pieces that are scaled for exterior installation are constructed of welded steel and primed and powder coated for a durable finish.   I often combine the steel forms with high fire ceramic stoneware that has been freeze/thaw tested.

I have committed to creating Public Art in the last five years.  I really appreciate the ways this genre can define communities and bring pride and a unique sense of place to the area.   When I make large scale, outdoor work I am very sensitive to both the environment in which it would be installed, as well as practical issues such as safety, longevity, how it will react in weather, how it withstands winds, and how people will interact with it.  My art is influenced not only by the landscape here, but by Mexican folk art, Spanish traditions, and the local humanity.  I embrace forms that look familiar, in multiple ways, and because of this people often see more than one thing in my work.  

​​   ​Suzanne Kane